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Search inside "How to Get out of your Lease"!



How to get out of your lease

by Eric E. Willison, Esq. and
Andrew J. Ruzicho II, Esq.
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List Price: $12.95
Your Price: $9.95
Availability:Immediate receipt upon payment
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Inside this Book

    Everything you always wanted to know about how to break a lease, breaking a lease, and early lease termination - these strategies are applicable in all states

    Topics covered include:

    • How to legally break a lease
    • 10 proven strategies to help you get out of your lease
    • What reasons won't work for breaking a lease
    • How to limit potential liability if you do break your apartment lease
    • How to assemble documentation and evidence to defend against a suit for breaking your lease
    • How to answer a complaint for early lease termination and assert a counterclaim
    • Sample answer in response to breaking a lease
    • Sample counterclaim
    • Sample lease termination letter
    • Appendix of individual state statutory provisions relevant to breaking a lease

    • Now in searchable pdf format


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Top mistakes renters make when trying to break their lease


Don't make the same mistakes yourself!
    1. Renters leave the apartment without giving notice to landlord.

    2. Renters fail to evidence the condition of the apartment when they do break the lease.

    3. Renters assume that job transfers will get them out of leases.

    4. Renters trust the landlord when he claims he will let them out of their lease when they find a house to buy.

    5. Renters don't know the laws in their state.

    6. Renters have no idea how to negotiate with their landlords.

    7. Will unlawful entries by a landlord get you out of your lease?

    8. What if your potential roommate refuses to sign the lease?

    9. What if the landlord can't provide you occupancy of the apartment on time?

    10. Is the landlord not making repairs to the apartment?

Consider our publication, "How to get out of your lease," in which we go through 10 strategies that you may be able to employ, depending upon your situation, to get out of your lease.

Bookmark this page - you'll be back!
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Testimonials

Thnks to your guidebook, I was able to get out of my lease. With your suggestions, I was able to approach my landlord and negotiate a compromise. Now I've moved out and am much happier in my new place. - Molly Ramsey


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Product Details - "How to break a lease"


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Excerpts from "How to get out of your lease"

I recently had a case where a husband and wife had met with a real estate agent (who worked on behalf of the landlord) concerning signing a one year lease for an apartment. The couple had recently moved to the Central Ohio area and wanted to buy a home but needed an apartment until they found a home. The realtor must have indicated that they had to sign a one year lease because the couple asked if they could get out of the lease early if they found a home. The realtor indicated that they could as long as the realtor could find someone else to move in and take over the rental payments.

Sure enough, a few months later the couple found a home and gave notice that they were moving out. They received no response from the realtor. They called the realtor several times and never got a return call. The couple decided to pay an extra month's rent and to also leave their security deposit with the landlord. Because they never heard back from the realtor they assumed that the apartment had been re-rented.

Several months later, they received a bill from the landlord for back rent and late fees. This came as a shock to the couple as they thought the apartment was re-rented. The tenants responded by indicating just that and also requested that the landlord give them proof of all efforts made to re- rent the apartment. In Ohio, landlords have a duty to make reasonable efforts to re-rent apartments in such cases. They can't just sit back and do nothing while collecting rent.

Many months passed and the landlord and tenant went back and forth via correspondence. The landlord finally supplied proof of his efforts to re-rent the apartment some 9 months after the first request was made to do so.

I got involved in the case and took the realtor's deposition (this is where I ask him questions outside of court and he answers under oath). It turns out the realtor worked as the leasing agent for several landlords in this same complex where the couple's apartment was. After receiving notice that the couple was moving out, the realtor rented two similar apartments to other renters but not the couple's apartment. When the judge found this out, he was not impressed. The judge didn't like the fact that the realtor was serving more than one master. If the landlord has a duty to make efforts to re-rent the apartment and he hires a real estate agent to fulfill his duty, how can the real estate agent effectively do this if he works for several landlords in the same complex?

We resolved the case without going to trial but the judge seemed to be indicating that he may rule that the tenant's duty to pay rent ended when similar apartments belonging to other landlords in the same complex were rented out. The landlord was going to argue that the apartments were different because the ones that were rented just had a one car garage and his had a two car garage and a fireplace.

The tenants could have defeated such an argument (continued in publication)
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Complete Tenant's Kit

Click on cover of any ebook for complete description or to buy any product separately

Complete tenant's kit - which includes

    1. Ohio Renter's Rights: How to take on your landlord;
    2. Guide to getting out of your lease;
    3. Tenant's Guide to Fighting an Eviction;
    4. How to make the best case to get your security deposit back;
    5. How to get your landlord to make repairs;
    6. How to deal with noisy neighbors;
    7. Landlord and Tenant's Guide to Understanding Lease Provisions;
    8. A free subscription to our bi-monthly newsletter on Ohio landlord tenant law;

    all for only $19.95, for a savings of over $26.00 when compared with the price of buying all products separately

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